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Our Voice of Real Australia podcast makes great listening for your road trip this Easter break

Craig Hall, Sherry McArdle-English, Anne McGrath and Fred McGrath Weber and Paul Keir want certainty for the Majura Valley producers. Picture: Matt Loxton
Craig Hall, Sherry McArdle-English, Anne McGrath and Fred McGrath Weber and Paul Keir want certainty for the Majura Valley producers. Picture: Matt Loxton

If you're hitting the road this Easter break, let our podcast ride shotgun.

Voice of Real Australia showcases stories from regional Australia -- the perfect soundtrack for a drive across this great land.

You can find the podcast by searching Voice of Real Australia in Apple Podcasts, Spotify or your preferred podcast app.

The show comes out fortnightly, and there's plenty to choose from already.

Here's what you can listen to right now:

Majura Valley: Lease Insecurity and Canberra's farming past, present and potential

You have heard of the Barossa Valley, Hunter Valley and Yarra Valley. But have you ever been to the Majura Valley? We talked to local farmers about lease insecurity, and the arrested potential of the land they love.

Dr David McGrath, right, bought land in Canowindra rich with fish fossils. Paleontologist Dr Alex Ritchie, left, unearthed the site in 1993. Picture: Sitthixay Ditthavong

Dr David McGrath, right, bought land in Canowindra rich with fish fossils. Paleontologist Dr Alex Ritchie, left, unearthed the site in 1993. Picture: Sitthixay Ditthavong

Uncovering Canowindra's forgotten fish fossils

In 1993 near Canowindra Dr Alex Ritchie was given 10 days for an exploratory fossil dig, he could only scratch the surface. We explore why the fossil site has been buried for decades and how the sale of the land will affect it's future.

Wytaliba and Torrington fires: When wilderness escapes become death traps

New England NSW was scorched before summer even began. In the town of Torrington homes over a century old burned. In Wytaliba, an alternative commune, two people died. Homes among the gum trees became fodder for fire. We visit these towns, one year on.

Jozef Meyer checks a light trap in Kosciuszko National Park. Picture: Kate Matthews.

Jozef Meyer checks a light trap in Kosciuszko National Park. Picture: Kate Matthews.

What's killing our Snow Gums?

The iconic snow gum is dying out. Scientists believe a beetle is killing off the trees in the Snowy Mountains, but it's not clear why the trees have become vulnerable, nor how to stop the dieback. If the snow gum were lost it would impact an entire ecosystem.

On board the Aurora Australis, the only Australian-made Antarctic icebreaker

The retired Aurora Australis was built at Carrington Slipways upriver from Newcastle and is the only Australian-made icebreaker. There was a push to preserve it for its heritage value. We speak to people who sailed on the iconic ship.

Newcastle resident Rachael Scott is worried gas drilling will destroy the coast she loves. Picture: Fleur Connick

Newcastle resident Rachael Scott is worried gas drilling will destroy the coast she loves. Picture: Fleur Connick

PEP 11 gas rigs loom on the horizon, and Launceston stuck in the mud

Offshore gas drilling has been opposed by a lot of communities on the NSW coast. Meanwhile, Launceston tries to find a balance between environment and lifestyle as it grapples with mud build up in the Tamar River.

Pale, male and stale: Where are all our Indigenous cricketers?

There's an underrepresentation of First Nations players in cricket compared to AFL and NRL. We explore the racist policies that whitewashed cricket and see what's being done to redress the historical exclusion.

Beaudesert's heritage saleyard stands up to council bulldozing

A beloved pig and calf saleyard in Beaudesert was recently given heritage status. But in an unusual case, Scenic Rim Regional Council is challenging the heritage listing. And the community is outraged.

Aussie Ark's Tim Faulkner is excited to see what impact the devils have on the ecology of the Barrington Tops. PHOTO: Supplied

Aussie Ark's Tim Faulkner is excited to see what impact the devils have on the ecology of the Barrington Tops. PHOTO: Supplied

Devils on the mainland, and Australia's biggest whale stranding

There are now 26 Tasmanian Devils calling Barrington Tops home. We find out why. We also go to the island's West Coast to learn more about the stranding of 470 pilot whales that made international headlines last year.

The Drip Gorge and the women fighting for it

The Drip was added to the Goulburn River National Park a couple of years ago, but some locals are anxious that the nearby Moolarben coal mine and its plans for expansion could damage the cliffs, impact the water table, and render this unique and beloved spot too dangerous to visit.

Coal ash is a byproduct of coal power generation and makes up a quarter of Australia's waste stream, Picture: Laura Corrigan

Coal ash is a byproduct of coal power generation and makes up a quarter of Australia's waste stream, Picture: Laura Corrigan

Coal-ash pitfalls and possibilities, a postcard from Dimboola, and a COVID-19 storybook

Dimboola is attracting tree-changers from far and wide. We take a tour. We also hear from Lake Macquarie locals concerned about the impact of coal-ash pollution on waterways. And, a Tumut pre-school teacher has written a children's book to explain the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dubbo's drug problem, and Black Summer still haunts Cobargo

In Dubbo, drugs are everywhere. The NSW government has committed to funding a local rehabilitation and detox centre in town. It is something locals have been petitioning for for decades. However, there was no mention of a corresponding "Drug Court". Meanwhile Cobargo rebuilds after Black Summer.

Volunteer firefighters Jet Boone, Lise Percival and Samantha Walker gear up in the Bawley Point Rural Fire Brigade's shed. The brigade has 18 female members. Picture: Sitthixay Ditthavong

Volunteer firefighters Jet Boone, Lise Percival and Samantha Walker gear up in the Bawley Point Rural Fire Brigade's shed. The brigade has 18 female members. Picture: Sitthixay Ditthavong

Bawley Point brigade's new recruits take fight to bushfire fears

Bawley Point was one of the first South Coast villages to be threatened by the ferocious Currowan fire that ravaged the region. In the wake of the fires the local RFS brigade has seen an influx of new recruits, including women and teenagers, eager to help out next time.

Dungog's biking boom, and the telehealth revolution in the bush

Have you used telehealth before? There's a lot of positive feedback to the changes but there's also anxiety around what impact it will have on rural health provision. And we go for a ride in Dungog. The Hunter Valley town of 2000 has seen a recent tourism boom thanks to mountain biking.

This story Catch up on the podcast about the bush and for the bush first appeared on Newcastle Herald.