Addo-Carr channels Wellington boxing legend as Storm 'rattle' Panthers

TRY TIME: Josh Add-Carr slices through to score at Carrington Park on Saturday night. Photo: AAP
TRY TIME: Josh Add-Carr slices through to score at Carrington Park on Saturday night. Photo: AAP

Josh Addo-Carr latches on to a pass from Will Chambers and speeds over for a try out wide, finishing off a seriously slick backline move by the Melbourne Storm.

Fair chance that could happen a lot in 2019, too.

But after he dives over at Carrington Park on Saturday night, Addo-Carr gets up then goes bang-bang-bang - right hook, left jab, right jab, left straight. 

Shadow boxing never looked so slick.

But it's the post try celebration honouring an Australian legend, Addo-Carr's grandfather, Wally Carr.

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Boxing royalty, Wally Carr hails from Wellington, about 150 kilometres north west of Bathurst.

It's a Group 11 stronghold that, if rugby league was a source of renewable energy, would light up New South Wales.

And although he didn't grow up there, the flying Storm winger can't help but feel a connection with the community.

LEGEND: Boxing champion, Wellington born Wally Carr. Photo: AAP

LEGEND: Boxing champion, Wellington born Wally Carr. Photo: AAP

"Me and my grandfather Wally Carr, we've got a lot of relatives out there. I go up there every now and then and see the mob," he said, a handful of those Wellington connections making the trip to Bathurst for the NRL clash.

Addo-Carr also makes time to catch up with Blake Ferguson and Kotoni Staggs when the trio is in Sydney - a couple more Wellington boys making it big in the NRL.

"He's a quality player, Kotoni ... he and Blakey Ferguson, I think they're having an outstanding year. Represent," he smiles, before bursting out with that trademark cackle.

The Storm's form, though, well that's no laughing matter.

It goes to show if we hold the ball we can rattle teams.

Storm winger Josh Addo-Carr after his side's 32-2 victory over Penrith.

The club's 32-2 systematic dismantling of Penrith at Carrington Park had all the hallmarks of a Storm demolition job.

Step by step the Melbourne boys took the game away from the Panthers, a win capped by a try to second-game NRL rookie Marion Seve.

Seve battled testicular cancer as a 17-year-old and the celebration after his try at the southern end of Carrington Park six years later showed how much that moment meant to Seve and the Storm.

Likewise for Addo-Carr, his try at the same end of the ground in the second half was crucial for his side and his own personal gain.

The NSW blues incumbent on the left wing, Addo-Carr says he's feeling the heat thanks to the barnstorming form of Eels beast Ferguson.

But he says the competition is healthy and his game is set to reach new heights in 2019 - music to Brad Fittler's ears, no doubt.

"That's great competition for all NSW outside backs, to improve and be better. He's definitely the benchmark at the moment," Addo-Carr said of Ferguson.

"Everyone has to be better and that's what Freddy and everyone at NSWRL wants.

"I'm just trying to run hard, get quick play the balls and build mometnum for my teammates and getting our sets started well.

"I've put on a couple of kgs on over the off season and it's definitely helped me be better at that. I don't think I've lost any speed. I'm feeling pretty good."

"For us at the Storm, there's a lot of improvement," he added, Melbourne on top of the ladder after the 30-point win over Penrith.

Improvement aside, the Storm had Penrith on the ropes and like Addo-Carr's grandfather Wally produced that knock-out blow.

FAMILY: Josh Add-Carr and boxing champ, grandfather Wally Carr. Photo: AAP

FAMILY: Josh Add-Carr and boxing champ, grandfather Wally Carr. Photo: AAP

"It goes to show if we hold the ball we can rattle teams," the Melbourne gun smiled.