The 'Who's Ya Mob Too' program hope to reconnect Aboriginal youths with their relatives.

FAMILY CONNECTIONS: Relatives Jody Chester, Glenda Bell, Leeanne Stanley, Joyce Williams and Loretta Stanley. Photo: NICK GRIMM
FAMILY CONNECTIONS: Relatives Jody Chester, Glenda Bell, Leeanne Stanley, Joyce Williams and Loretta Stanley. Photo: NICK GRIMM

The Wellington Aboriginal Corporation Health Service (WACHS), Wellington Local Aboriginal Land Council and Wellington TAFE are working together for upcoming cultural reconnection program ‘Whose Ya Mob Too’.

The program was revised following the success of the ‘Whose Ya Mob’ program run in December 2015 and will be held at the Wellington TAFE on Friday February 17.

The concept of the program is about raising an awareness of the history and family connections for Aboriginal mobs. 

The “Whose Ya Mob” program was developed following a conversation between Jody Chester and Leanne Stanley about the increasing number of family enquiries in relation to Aboriginal genealogy through their professional roles.

They decided to assist their local community by bringing services to support families in tracing their family history. 

Local Aboriginal elders will be present to share information and knowledge where possible to assist in people’s research journeys. 

The program aims to raise an awareness about Aboriginal history and family tracings, enabling people to explore where they fit in the discovery of where they belong and “Whose Ya Mob Too”.

Jody Chester from WACHS said the program is about healing.

“When we talk about bringing people home we’re talking about connecting people whose mobs were never able to reconnect.

“A lot of kids have lost track of their families and we’re helping to put history back together while we can,” Ms Chester said.

‘Aunty’ Glenda Bell said the program is all about understanding the familial connections. 

Leeanne Stanley agreed, saying it was important to the younger generations to know who they’re related to to avoid unwanted situations. 

“It’s vital because when a lot of young relationships start, it’s important to know who they’re all related too

Jody Chester from WACHS said the program is about healing.

“When we talk about bringing people home we’re talking about connecting people whose mobs were never able to reconnect.

“A lot of kids have lost track of their families and we’re helping to put history back together while we can,” Ms Chester said.

‘Aunty’ Glenda Bell said the program is all about understanding the family connections. 

Leeanne Stanley agreed, saying it was important to the younger generations to know who they’re related to to avoid unwanted situations. 

“It’s vital because when a lot of young relationships start, it’s important to know who they’re all related to.”